Chengdu the center of Three Kingdoms Cultural Tourism

Authors: Go Chengdu

2014-10-26

Chengdu is making an ambitious plan to promote the theme tourism focusing the Three Kingdoms culture as a trans-regional route connecting the important sites of the Three Kingdoms Culture across China,which has been proposed by scholars and tourism institutions to attract tourists from home and abroad, especially those from eastern Asian countries.
Chengdu is making an ambitious plan to promote the theme tourism of Three Kingdoms culture as a trans-regional route connecting the important sites of the Three Kingdoms Culture,which has been proposed by scholars and tourism institutions to attract tourists from home and abroad, especially from eastern Asian countries. Chengdu boasts abundant resources for the theme tourism as it has the Wuhou Shrine, the most important historical site of Three Kingdoms culture and a number of other sites around the city.
The Three Kingdoms (AD 220–280), a tripartite between the states of Wei, Shu, and Wu, followed the loss of the de facto power of the Han dynasty in China, ushering in the start of the Period of Disunity. To further distinguish the three states from other historical Chinese states of the same name, historians have added a relevant character: Wei is also known as Cao Wei, Shu is also known as Shu Han, and Wu is also known as Eastern Wu.
In a strict academic sense, the period of the Three Kingdoms refers to the period between the foundation of the state of Wei in 220 AD and the conquest of the state of Wu by the Jin dynasty in 280.
The Three Kingdoms period was the chaotic era in Chinese history, featuring incessant wars and the rise of numerous heroic figures during the years. A population census during the late Eastern Han dynasty reported a population of approximately 50 million, while a population census during the early Western Jin dynasty reported a population of approximately 16 million.
Although relatively short, this historical period has been greatly romanticized in the cultures of China, Japan, Korea, and Vietnam. It has been celebrated and popularized in operas, folk stories, novels and in more recent times, films, television, and video games. The best known of these is Luo Guanzhong's Romance of the Three Kingdoms, a Ming dynasty historical novel based on events in the Three Kingdoms period. The authoritative historical record of the era is Chen Shou's Records of the Three Kingdoms, along with Pei Songzhi's later annotations of the text.
Chengdu was the capital of the Shu-han State during the Three Kingdoms period. Eyed as the orthordox successor of the Han Dynasty, the Shu-han State wins sympathy from people of later generations and its emperor Liu Bei and Prime Minister Zhu Geliang, among other figures, enjoy high popularity among the Chinese people and in eastern Asian countries including Japan, Korea and Vietnam.
Wuhou Shrine
Wuhou Shrine (Temple of Marquis Wu) is the most influential museum of the Three-kingdom culture in China. It was built in the Western Jin period (265-316) in honor of Zhuge Liang, the famous military and political strategist who was Prime Minister of the Shu-Han State during the Three Kingdoms period (220-280). The Shrine highlights the Zhuge Liang Memorial Temple and the Hall of Liu Bei, along with statues of other historical figures of Shu-Han, as well as cultural relics like stone inscriptions and tablets.
Guan Yu Temple in Qiqu Mountain
Guan Yu (162-219) was a military general under the warlord Liu Bei during the late Eastern Han Dynasty and Three Kingdoms period in ancient China. He played a significant role in the civil war that LED to the collapse of the Han Dynasty and the establishment of the Kingdom of Shu.
Zhang Fei Temple
The Zhang Fei Temple was constructed to honor General Zhang Fei, a Chinese military leader from the Three Kingdoms Period. According to legend, the gold used to finance the construction of the temple was fished out of the Yangtze River, along with the severed head of the general, who had been killed by two of his underlings.During the 1,700 years since the temple was constructed, successive dynasties and emperors have added extensions to it. The temple includes an enormous hall in which a large statue of Zhang Fei can be found, a tower called Jieyi Tower, and pavilions to honor the poet Du Fu, who lived in the temple for two years.
Jianmen Pass
Jianmen Pass is a mountain pass located southwest of the city of Guangyuan in Sichuan province. It has also been called "Jianmenguan Pass"; however, that form is redundant since guan means "pass" in Chinese.The mountain pass was a part of Shudao, literally it means the routes of the Shu. The construction of the gate was related to the Three Kingdoms era strategist, Shu prime minister Zhuge Liang.Jianmen Pass lost its military value but became a major tourist attraction because the history of it. In 1980s, Chinese government rebuilt the old gate structure.
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